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Leaning too much on elected officials, state and federal bureaucrats

To the editor:

Have we gotten to a point in our “advanced” society where we have become so helpless to tend to our own needs and wants that we must turn to elected officials and non-elected bureaucrats at higher and higher government levels to cure all our wants and needs?

I mean if there is a pothole to be fixed, do we have to wait for a governor, a federal representative or senator or some un-elected state or federal bureaucrat to see that it is repaired or should that fall within the local purview of a council member, mayor of a city or county elected official?

If that’s not the case, then what is there purpose of being in those positions? Weren’t they elected to “manage” a city or county using local taxes?

Seems to me that they have just become paper pushing bureaucrats themselves to acquire additional funding in order to meet requirements imposed by the next higher level of a government authoritative bureaucracy.

Where did that higher level of authority came from? How did they get that authority and power it seems to have?

When did the legislation get debated, pass through both the House and Senate and get signed by a president or governor to “delegate” to a bureaucracy, the authority to write and enforce rules written by un-elected bureaucrats?

The Constitution does not give authorization to Congress to delegate their power to a non-elected body and I don’t recall where we, the people, gave them that consent either.

As it is now and has been for some time, our local elected officials seem to have to continually reach for higher levels of government to do the things that should be handled locally, which creates more bureaucracy, costs and delays. Most importantly, all the costs and delays involved required to go up and down that costly chain of bureaucracy adds to the actual cost of the repair and makes it even more costly.

And, of course, we, the taxpayer, pay for every cent of it.

Roger Baumann

Wabasso

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