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Low crop prices, high rentals mean risk for farmers in 2014

According to a U of M Extension analysis, without a significant rebound in crop prices, farmers face a losing year in 2014

December 20, 2013

MARSHALL — If corn and soy prices remain low, farmers might not make a profit in 2014, according to a report by the University of Minnesota Extension....

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(14)

ticked

Dec-20-13 8:12 AM

They are still paying an average of $9-10 thousand a per acre locally for land. So it can’t be too bad. It’s always doom and gloom if you ask farmers. If they don't make any money next year maybe they can get a job for the other 44 weeks out of the year.

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cowhand

Dec-20-13 8:34 AM

Ticked, you must be a totally self-supportive individual, sitting in a nice warm home with your belly full to make such a bold statement about the amount time the farming and ranching community put in to feeding the world... totally unaware of what all is involved in a farm or ranch operation, as well. There's "complainers" in every profession; yours too, I bet, if you're employed.

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ticked

Dec-20-13 8:52 AM

LOL. "feeding the world" That cracks me up everytime I hear it.

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rona45

Dec-20-13 9:10 AM

Ticked, You're missing the opportunity of your lifetime get out of your mothers basement and buy some land so you can start farming. Just think of the satisfaction you will get earning a living not having to depend on Obama for a free Obama phone and free Obama-care.

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Hitter

Dec-20-13 12:07 PM

Can't wait to see how many planned for the prices to drop? Hope I don't have to help pay for the costs they have taken on paying $8,000-$10,000 acre and all the new equipment.

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westline

Dec-20-13 1:26 PM

One of the reasons land prices are high is that people want to own something real when this obama-led economic whirlpool starts spinning down. What will the value of the dollar, and the stock market look like when the rising interest on obama's 20 trillion dollar debt cripples our economy?

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westline

Dec-20-13 1:33 PM

And Tickled, unless you live on rabbit food, someone is feeding, cleaning, milking, and tending to the animals that make your meat, milk, eggs, cheese, and even bacon, every day. It must be done in all kinds of weather, on Christmas, Easter, through illness, and fatigue. Most of those who care for animals don't see the value in complaining on this website, they have better things to do. Thank you to farmers, who do in fact feed the world.

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DuPage

Dec-20-13 2:38 PM

Westline's comments are right on the mark. Fact is,most of the area's first, second, and third generation farmers started out working 12 to 15 hours a day milking cows, producing feed, and tending livestock 365 days per year, year in and year out. If they now run strictly a grain operation,they have "paid their dues." High land and cash rent prices are the result of supply & demand,and return on investment. You might be surprised at the number of non-farmer owned acres. Investors want something they can see and they want a 3% to 5% return on their investment. As in any free market, there will be winners and losers. I do believe an adjustment in land values and cash rents is coming.

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Hitter

Dec-20-13 7:28 PM

Every single person can say they worked their butt off to get where they are at today. But most people don't get to insure against their losses, don't get gov't subsidies regardless of supply and demand, and while I appreciate the food that is raised, I helped make the things a farmer needs to make that food. I know I worked just as hard and sacrificed just as much, but have not received just as much compensation.

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westline

Dec-20-13 8:15 PM

Today, land was sold in Marshall at auction. It was bought by an investor, not a farmer. 2 pieces, 9200 and 10250 per acre, I believe. I can't read the guy's mind, but I would bet he wants to protect his money.

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lefselady

Dec-20-13 8:20 PM

I just read that farmers work an average of 10 hours per day 7 days per week. How many people can say that? Some days it may be a few hours, other days it may be 18 hours. This includes marketing grain or livestock as well as time spent in a tractor. There is way more to farming than just putting in and taking out a crop. People who aren't farmers don't usually understand that. Farming is not 5 days a week with paid vacations. It is 7 days a week and if you want to go away, you hire someone to take care of your livestock. We have resigned ourselves to the fact that we will not buy more land for our operation because of the price of land. If we want to have it paid off before the age of 65 it is impossible. Cash rent prices are ridiculous in this area. When prices went up so did rent and now that prices are down rent is the same. I hope other farmers have planned ahead as much as my husband has.

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westline

Dec-21-13 8:03 AM

Farming looks mighty easy when your plough is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field.

Dwight D. Eisenhower

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johnlittle

Dec-21-13 11:59 AM

Its hard to understand why we cant let the free market apply to farming. farming has paid very very well since the 1980s. Farmers in Dwight D. Eisenhower day werent propped up the way they are now

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rangeral

Dec-23-13 8:41 PM

As the late, great Jonathon winters said about farmers:

Hold a chicken under your right arm, pet a cow. You've done a lot for us lately, but now something more.

It is always too hot or too cold, too wet or too dry, prices are too high or too low - but the one thing that keeps the farmer in the dough are all the taxpayer subsidies. Never met a poor farmer, unless he/she were incredibly stupid.

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